Via Fox Business

Wall Street opened with declines on Wednesday as investors reacted to the news of upcoming trade talks between the U.S. and China, as well as a probe by the Trump administration into Silicon Valley giants and disappointing earnings from Boeing and Caterpillar.

Despite the decreases, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all still remain near record-territory.

Second-quarter earnings will roil the markets all-day on Wednesday as Facebook, Ford Motor Co. and other top U.S. firms prepare to release financial results through June after the closing bell. Kicking off the day, Caterpillar reported $14.43 billion in revenue and profits of $2.83 per share, both below analyst expectations.

Boeing also missed projections, reporting a profit loss of $5.21 per share compared to Wall Street predictions of $1.87 per share. Revenue in the second quarter was $15.8 billion, less than the expected $18.55 billion.

While early, 79 percent of companies that have reported earnings exceeded earnings projections, while 65 percent beat revenue predictions. Overall, S&P 500 earnings are up 8.7 percent from 2018.

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U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are heading to Shanghai next week to meet with their Chinese counterparts – Vice Premier Liu He and Commerce Minister Zhong Shan.

The talks are aimed at restarting negotiations after Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping reached a deal in June to withhold the imposition of new tariffs as the two nations seek to craft a trade deal.

Meanwhile, shares for Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google all fell in premarket trading after the Department of Justice announced it would investigate technology firms for possible anticompetitive behavior.

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The agency vowed to seek redress if any violations of wrongdoing were uncovered in the probe.

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Oil was trading higher on Wednesday ahead of a report from the Energy Information Administration that is expected to highlight that crude stockpiles fell 4 million barrels.