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Furious SJWs Lash Out At ‘Child-Caging’ Google After Labor Activist Firings

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Via Zerohedge

Capping off months of escalating tension between Google and what the NYT described as “a vocal contingent of workers who have protested the company’s handling of sexual harassment, its treatment of contract employees, and its work with the Defense Department, federal border agencies and the Chinese government”, Google on Thursday fired four employees, including several who were involved in labor organizing at the company.

Claiming that all four had repeatedly violated “data security policies” (what multiple sources have characterized as a technicality and a ruse to obscure the rank unionbusting, the company sent a memo announcing the dismissals to staff. That letter was obtained by the NYT and a story based on its contents was published Thursday evening.

Since then, the SJW twitter warriors have thrown everything they could in the way of tweets expressing their frustration that Google would dare to retaliate against a group of employees who have already cost it hundreds of millions of dollars in profits by sabotaging the company’s bid for a billion-dollar government contract.

Of course, there’s no better way to ingratiate yourself to your employer and ensure their continued patronage than to deliberately screw them out of millions. But according to sanctimonious SJW logic, Google is somehow in the wrong. Of course, if it were up to this hyper-progressive group, the company  would abandon all of its contracts with the “evil” US government, and employees would routinely be interrogated for any ‘threatening’ political opinions, and anybody who dares to say anything that goes against their progressive orthodoxies would be forced out. Shareholders, including millions of retirees and ‘normal’ people, would lose billions.

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But that’s not all: This same group helped sabotage (or at least interrupt) the company’s plan to re-launch in China, and has resulted in the ouster of several executives over sexual harassment allegations.

More immediately, Google has been criticized for hiring a consulting firm that has helped companies suppress unionization efforts.

According to the NYT, the move wasn’t entirely unexpected: two of the more high-profile employees had recently been suspende.

The dismissals are expected to exacerbate rocky relations between Google’s management and a vocal contingent of workers who have protested the company’s handling of sexual harassment, its treatment of contract employees, and its work with the Defense Department, federal border agencies and the Chinese government.

Tensions have increased as Google has cracked down on what had long been a freewheeling work culture that encouraged employees to speak out. Google recently canceled a regular series of companywide meetings that allowed workers to pose questions to senior executives and began working with a consulting firm that has helped companies quell unionization efforts.

The changes are a remarkable turn for a company that has been considered a standard for the modern workplace. Google introduced many of the office perks that are now common across Silicon Valley, and its embrace of transparent relations between workers and management has influenced a generation of start-ups.

This month, Google placed two employees, Laurence Berland and Rebecca Rivers, on administrative leave, saying they had gotten into confidential documents that were not relevant to their work. They were among the four workers who were fired, according to two people familiar with the dismissals.

On Twitter, SJWs lauded the “brave” organizers who risked their comfortable livelihoods to bring better working conditions for Googlers, who enjoy some of the cushiest perks and pay packages in the US.

To them, it’s a clear violation of Google’s “Don’t be evil” motto.

But then again, sometimes that’s what happens when you encourage employees to speak their mind.

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