By most perspectives, Trump has been a hands-off president in the foreign policy arena, with the visible exception of antagonizing Iran and fostering a withdrawal from – and then an about-face return to – Syria, where U.S. troops are now standing guard around northern Syria’s Kurdish-area oil to keep it from getting into Assad’s hands (it does, anyway). In some respects, that hands-off, zero-geopolitical-deep-state way of thinking from purely a foreign policy perspective has been a relief. In some respects, it has led to some accidental snowballing (by this, we mean random actions that are based on not clearly understanding what the consequences will be), both positive and negative. 

On one hand, Trump can take credit for bringing together massive Middle East rivals – Israel and the UAE. By the same token, however, this happened largely because of Israel’s newfound power as an energy exporter – a major gamechanger for the region. 

On the other hand, Trump’s move to relocate the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem was an unnecessary salvo that would ripple into divided and always fragile Lebanon, and the pressure would be too great. The entire government would fall and the country would descend into chaos. But Trump also then brokered a deal between Israel and Lebanon for talks that would finally, peacefully demarcate the maritime border between the two countries, who remain technically at war. 

So, now, Lebanon – often…


Via Oilprice.com

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