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Hong Kong said on Sunday it would ramp up testing at border checkpoints in a bid to check a new wave of coronavirus infections. Truck drivers and students, as well as air crew and shipping personnel, would be subject to greater scrutiny, authorities said. A government spokesman said exemptions to an entry ban were needed to “maintain … operation of the society and the economy, and to ensure an uninterrupted supply of all daily necessities”.

Singapore continues to record hundreds of positive coronavirus cases daily in foreign worker dormitories, even as few Covid-29 infections are found elsewhere in the city-state. The health ministry on Sunday reported an additional 257 cases, with all but eight found among migrant labourers living in group accommodation.

British prime minister Boris Johnson contradicted his own chief scientist on Sunday by playing down the idea of another nationwide lockdown due to the coronavirus. Speaking to the Sunday Telegraph, the prime minister said he did not think the UK would be in the same position as it was in March, when the first lockdown was imposed. Patrick Vallance, the UK’s chief scientific adviser, said on Friday that another national lockdown was possible.

Nigeria’s foreign minister, Geoffrey Onyeama, said on Sunday he had tested positive for coronavirus. He said he underwent his fourth Covid-19 test on Saturday “at the first sign of a throat irritation”. The 64-year-old Mr Onyeama wrote on Twitter: “Unfortunately this time it came back positive. That is life! Win some lose some. Heading for isolation in a health facility and praying for the best.” He has been foreign minister since 2015.

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A legal fight has broken out between EssilorLuxottica, maker of Ray-Ban and Oakley glasses, and retailer GrandVision, its €7bn Dutch takeover target. EssilorLuxottica said on Saturday it had started legal proceedings in the Netherlands to access information allowing it “to assess the way GrandVision has managed the course of its business during the Covid-19 crisis, alleging it had breached its obligations under the merger agreement.

The fate of thousands of small UK businesses affected by coronavirus will be at stake this week when regulators take on the insurance industry at the High Court in a legal battle worth potentially billions of pounds. Judges will be asked to make decisions on the thorny issue of how much insurers will have to pay out to companies under their business interruption policies to meet claims for Covid-19-related losses.

The head of India’s largest bank said the country’s escalating coronavirus outbreak risks jeopardising a years-long clean-up of the financial system if authorities and lenders aren’t ready to support struggling sectors such as aviation or hotels. Rajnish Kumar, chairman of the State Bank of India — India’s largest lender with more than $500bn in assets — said public—sector banks may require further capitalisation by the government.

Seven more plaintiffs have joined a lawsuit against a US education department decision to force state schools to share Covid-19 relief funds with private schools. The city of New York, Hawaii, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Chicago, and the Cleveland and San Francisco school districts are plaintiffs joining a suit filed by the California and Michigan attorneys general. Maine, New Mexico, Wisconsin and the District of Columbia joined earlier.

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Via Financial Times