Amazon is hiring another 100,000 workers in the US and Canada, in its fourth such recruitment spree this year, as it races to keep up with a surge in online shopping fuelled by social-distancing curbs and lockdowns.

The world’s largest online retailer said in a statement that the extra jobs would comprise full and part-time positions in its home country and in Canada, as it rolls out 100 new warehouse and operations sites this month.

The new roles, which will expand Amazon’s fulfilment and logistics networks, will take the number of employees excluding contractors at the group to close to 1m. At the end of June, Amazon put its headcount at 876,000 worldwide.

Amazon has been consistently ramping up the size of its workforce since western economies began implementing coronavirus lockdowns and social-distancing restrictions in March. The group said in March and April that it would hire 175,000 new staff. This month, it also announced 33,000 new jobs in its corporate and technology teams.

Dave Clark, Amazon’s senior vice-president of worldwide operations, insisted that the rapid workforce expansion would not come at the expense of staff training or health.

“Our expansion also comes with an unwavering commitment to safety,” he said.

“In addition to fast and efficient delivery for our customers, we’re providing a safe and modern environment for our employees and partners.”

The hiring push reinforces Amazon’s position as one of the top beneficiaries from the pandemic. The group’s net income doubled in its most recent fiscal quarter to a record $5.2bn, after sales rose 40 per cent. Optimism about the group’s prospects, combined with a rally since March in technology stocks that has begun to correct this month, has powered its market capitalisation to close to $1.6tn.

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The new employees will be paid at least $15 an hour and receive a bonus of up to $1,000 for signing on in certain cities, the company said.

Shares were up 2 per cent on Monday in pre-market trading to $3,181 a share.

Via Financial Times